Psychotherapists and Counsellors Answer your Questions

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  • Reed Everingham
    My journey to psychotherapy has for the most part been intuitive. My first encounter with psychotherapy was during my early twenties. I worked with a wonderful practitioner for a number of years and this experience left a profound imprint. For the first time, I understood what it really felt like to repair, grow and change. This set me on a path of personal development – a path I am still walking - with the intention of understanding others and myself better. ...
  • Kate Mikhailouskaya
    Many personal and professional experiences contributed to my choice of becoming a therapist. It's a life-long process and it's ongoing, but what remains unchangeable is my passion to witness the growth and transformation with my clients in the moments of psycho-therapeutic or psychoanalytic journey. It is fascinating and very rewarding work, and I am committed to it fully. This includes ongoing professional development, group and individual supervision as well as my capacity and willingness to self-explore and reflect on my...
  • Penny Downy
    After many years working in different caring fields and undergoing my own in-depth personal therapy and reaping the rewards of this, I decided to 'live my passion' and study psychotherapy and counselling. Through my work I am able to utilize my calm, inquisitive and positive nature, professional education and ongoing commitment to lifelong learning and a wealth of lifetime of experiences. I believe that each individual has the ability to heal themselves. It is my privilege to accompany them on this journey, help them identify their...
  • Nerine Strachan
    I noticed a natural ability to converse with, and understand others. People seem to trust me very quickly and open up, naturally feeling safe in my presence. This combined with personal challenging experiences, led me to study counselling. This study was not only theoretical but a process of self discovery, which developed my natural abilities further so that I can effectively help others through the therapeutic relationship....
  • Lara Petrulis
    As I reflect on this question, I’m not sure if I can say that it was a definite choice that I made. Given my supportive family environment, it seemed a natural progression to continue offering care to others. I can remember as a young child facilitating discussions with my siblings - encouraging them to “communicate openly and express their feelings…” – I just needed to understand the theory behind the practice and perhaps refine my skills a tad! ...
  • Ron Dowd
    I feel it has chosen me. Although I worked for many years as a software engineer, I was reading Jung in my 20s and was fascinated, though I didn't understand much of it. I guess I was on the common "hero's journey" path, working in I.T. but also starting to make art. At a certain point I made a serious decision to study art and undertook my MA (Hons) thesis in landscape and imaginal thinking. It was this study that opened up the world of Gestalt to me, particularly its ideas of figure / ground. It was odd how my art works...
  • Mano Suttner
    I did not choose it. It just happened just as birth and death and everything in between just happen. Our stories about choosing things are made up post facto. Nevertheless, often our conscious - or unconscious - intentions do manifest, and one of my life intentions has been to reduce suffering and to be part of creating abundance. ...
  • Fiona Halse
    Since I was a teenager I have been interested in meditation, therapy and personal development, yet didn’t think to work as a psychotherapist till I was nearly 40. I was attracted by the level of integrity and “whole human beingness” required in this work and passionately wanted to learn how to do it well. I have since come to realise how much it is about being rather that doing. At that time I wanted to be what the work would require of me, and I still do. In my journey I had met and been a client of many counsellors, then in...
  • Katharine Northall
    My Mother died very suddenly and unexpectedly. I sought some bereavement counselling and it changed my life. Going through a grieving process like this gave me a different perspective. My counsellor pointed out to me that I was self-aware and that I might make a good counsellor one day. After a long time of coming to terms with my loss I started taking counselling courses. My teacher encouraged me to take it further and complete a Master's Degree in Psychotherapy and I never looked back....
  • Emily Rotta
    I came into the profession after many years of volunteering my time with homeless people and street kids. This experience inspired me to study counselling formally and to use my skills to work with young people who are faced with homelessness, violence within the family and a lack of feeling connected to the school system, their family and themselves. I had over the many years' supported young people and helped them to find hope and meaning in their own lives as well as connecting them to support to assist with this....
  • Kate McMaugh
    I originally chose to study psychology as an 18 year old who was interested in "brains and behaviour" but I did not come from an academic family at all and really had little idea what a psychologist did and I don't think I had ever met one! However it turned out though my choice all those years ago was a lucky one, as I love what I do. As I got older and more aware of my profession it was the mind-body connection and the huge potential of the human being to heal that really hooked me into counselling. Psychology is such a broad...
  • Roger Perry
    As a high school teacher for many years, I found the most rewarding experiences for me were in the small amount of pastoral care that could be fitted into the busy school day. A university course in counselling and psychotherapy challenged me to know myself at a deep level - always a good thing - and private practice as a counsellor gave me more control over my life in doing what I love....
  • Megan Haire
    While raising a family in the outback and experiencing a lot of difficult experiences first hand or through close friends, I became interested in what makes some people vulnerable and other people resilient in the face of hardship. The outback experience heightened my awareness of the issue of isolation, both geographical and emotional, and how important human connection is in keeping us sane and happy. After my local community suffered a series of suicides during a drought, I wanted to do something to help make a difference to the...
  • Donald Marmara
    I was motivated to train as a somatic psychotherapist following my own experience of anxiety and depression, and the frustration I felt with my lack of success in overcoming them via limited methods of counselling and psychotherapy. My search for healing led me to London, where I discovered a form of psychotherapy called somatic psychotherapy, or body psychotherapy, and by having individual sessions myself I was able to transform my life....
  • Benjamin Shields
    It is a cliche, but I was one of those kids who wanted to 'help people' when he grew up. I couldn't think of any other profession that was as direct in this sense, as the work of a psychologist. So, that's what I pursued. As an 18-year-old, the long journey required to become a psychologist was difficult to comprehend. I studied for four years initially before undertaking a two-year internship, which involved regular supervision and study. After that, I completed a further two years of study for a masters program. Then still,...
  • Mariana Trapera
    I began studying Psychology some 20 years before I eventually returned to University and retrained as a Counsellor as I have had a deep interest in people, what makes us do what we do - the choices we make and the paths we take. Given my life experience, choices, mistakes and journey of my soul, I have felt called to 'midwife' others, and support them on their journeys to wellness....
  • Liz Scarfe
    I'd like to think I knew what led me here, but really, life and the directions it takes us is such a mystery, I probably don't know the full story. I started studying Process Oriented Psychology because I saw the depth of insight and awareness about life that it could give me - which is a deep kind of power. So was at first a very personal healing journey because Process Oriented Psychology demands the student do a significant amount of their own therapy, in part because therapy is so much about our capacity to connect with...
  • Nicole Kinnaird
    My choice to study Social Work initially was due to a strong interest in working with children and the idea of having fun in my job was very important and appealing. Out of rebellion I decided I didn’t want to be a teacher (like everyone else in my family it seemed! – mother, father, step father, grandfather, aunts, uncles.) As I gained experience in working therapeutically with children and the adults in their lives I increasingly enjoyed working creatively with people of all ages and also with groups of people. Continuing...
  • Geoff Heard
    I first studied massage, and was intrigued at the way people would, week after week, re-create in their bodies the tensions I had massaged away the week before. This led me to investigate the mind-body connection, and eventually to study Somatic Psychotherapy, in which mental, emotional and physical experience are seen as not only connected but as facets of a greater whole....
  • Emmaline Golding
    I moved around a lot growing up, and was always meeting new people and having to make new friends, so I became interested in people, and why we do what we do. I wasn't sure what I wanted to be when I grew up, so I decided to follow my passions and interests and see what happens! Now, I'm very glad that I chose psychology - I get to meet so many different people and help people who are often going through a rough time....
  • Sarah Tuckett
    Back in 2006 I spiraled down into depression and anxiety due to chronic stress at work. Thankfully I saw an Integrative GP who took into account my lifestyle, nutrition and underlying health issues instead of just prescribing me antidepressants. This started me on an exploration of mainstream and complimentary techniques for managing my depression. I found that massage had a wonderfully calming effect on my nervous system and my mood. So I studied remedial massage and started my own part-time remedial massage practice. I...
  • Steve White
    I decided on a career as a Psychotherapist & Counsellor as a result of a very successful and fruitful period of personal therapy, following a deep depression....
  • Sally Walsh
    we all deserve to give ourselves more choice and to live a fulfilling life...
  • Anne Di Lauro
    I started on the road to becoming a therapist a long time ago. As a child I loved reading. My first career was as a librarian and as part of my course I studied children's literature, including myths and fairy tales. Then I discovered the books on the psychological interpretation of fairy tales by Marie-Louise von Franz, a colleague of C.G. Jung. From then on I became an avid follower of Jung's psychology. It helped me to understand the (sometimes difficult) people in my life and it provided me with a sense of meaning for my own...
  • Karen Druce
    My family of origin experiences growing up formed the bedrock of my desire to understand individual differences, personal temperament, human suffering and resilience in the face of life’s storms. ...
  • Veronik Verkest
    After a difficult period in my work life, I physically became unwell and was eventually diagnosed with a chronic illness. My habitual way of pushing through difficulties and ignoring my body signals was no longer helpful. With the help of a somatic psychotherapist, I started to come back to listen to my body and process the emotional pain I had habitually pushed aside. As my relationship with my self and others transformed, I wished to share my excitement with others. This path led me to train as a relational somatic...
  • Josephine Baldacchino
    I have an interest in human behaviour, especially the science of human behaviour and helping my clients improve their life circumstances....
  • Ernst Meyer
    After a crisis in my private life I was looking for different ways to live my life. In my search for a more meaningful life I first participated in a couple of self help courses and eventually I enrolled in a training program for psychotherapy. Being in my own personal therapy was part of my training, and I first hand experienced the gradual changes that emerge in psychotherapy. After three years of "hands on" training I continued my education with another three years of academic studies in the field. As part of my academic...
  • Heather Cavill Greer
    Mainly my own healing journey inspired me to help others. I am fascinated by the power of the mind, and the ability we all have to I have to survive and heal ourselves. I have always enjoyed listening and helping people so the transition from Cancer Nursing into psychotherapy was an easy one. ...
  • John Dallimore
    Mid life brought about big changes in my life. One day I had well paying job and a career in St Georges Terrace. The next day I was retrenched along with many others. Even though I had reached the top in my career I had always felt out of place. Together with my wife I started a wilderness backpacking business guiding people throughout remote landscapes. Over a six year period I discovered people unfolded and became emotionally and spiritually well as we walked and talked and listened to each other. We began running trips with...
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