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Ms Jenny Sanbrook

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Ms Jenny Sanbrook

Mobile 0416 847 646
Family Therapist, Counsellor

Northside Therapy

Mobile 0416 847 646

Jenny uses a collaborative, validating approach to understand presenting concerns. Therapy is non-blaming and strengths are explored. Jenny encourages greater awareness of one's own behaviours and thoughts as a vehicle for change. Therapy may involve exploring early family of origin issues, attachment and losses and aims to identify strategies for dealing with anxiety and stress, to improve relationships and satisfaction in all domains of life.

PHONEPRACTICE LOCATIONS

  • Suite 4, 20 St Johns Avenue, Gordon, Sydney NSW 2072 0416 847 646 PHONE 0416 847 646

Services

  • Counselling, Psychotherapy, Family Therapy, Group Therapy, Assessment, Clinical Supervision 
  • Jenny is comfortable working with individuals, adolescents and families.
    Jenny uses ideas from a range of theoretical approaches such as Bowen Family Systems Theory, Attachment Theory, Milan Family Therapy, Emotionally Focussed Therapy, Mindfulness.

    Areas of Special Interest

  • Adolescent Issues, Anxiety / Panic Attacks, Depression, Divorce / Separation, Emotional Crisis, Family / Parenting, Grief / Bereavement, Life Transitions, Pre-marital Counselling, Relationship Issues, Schizophrenia, Spirituality / Religion, Trauma Recovery, Women's Issues  
  • MODALITIES / Approach

    ACT, Christian Counselling, Emotionally Focused Therapy, Marriage and Family, Mindfulness, Schema Therapy, Systems Theory

    Family systems approach which involves gaining a greater understanding of oneself in significant relationships such as nuclear family or family of origin.

    Jenny also works with individuals with adjustment or emotional issues in all domains of life.

    ACCREDITATIONS

    • Bachelor of Social Work - 1995
    • Masters Couple and Family Therapy - 2005
    • Certificate in Mental Health - 1996
    • Certificate in Social Work Supervision

    Professional Associations

    • Australian Association of Social Workers

    Background

    Jenny is a social worker with 20 years experience in mental health and counselling adolescents and families. She has worked at the Department of Child, Adolescent and Family Psychiatry (Redbank House) in Westmead, and previously in adult community mental health. She was also a clinical associate at the Family Systems Institute at Neutral Bay. Jenny completed a Masters of Social Work in Couple and Family Therapy at the University of NSW in 2005.

    Appointments

    Wednesdays 9am - 6pm
    Fridays 10am - 6pm
    Saturdays 9am – 12 midday

    Transport and Parking

    Parking is available

    Fees

    A medicare rebate applies with a referral from a GP, Paediatrician or Psychiatrist.

    Payment Options

    Cash, Cheque or credit card are accepted



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    10 Questions with Jenny Sanbrook

    • What led you to choose psychotherapy or counselling as a profession?

    • I went straight from high school to university and had no idea what I wanted to do at first. I knew that I enjoyed being around people, understanding the way people think and was good at understanding others and being a listening ear. I liked to solve problems and find little ways to show care to people around me. I was accepted into Social Work after school and from there it seemed like a natural progression. The course was more practical than exam based which suited the way I learn. Initially I wanted to work at a children's hospital but studied mental health as an elective. I became more interested in that aspect of things and in working with families. Perhaps at an unconscious level, my own desire to improve my family relationships at that time and as someone who wanted to have my own family in future was also a driver for me.
    • Which philosophical approaches have influenced your professional/personal development?

    • I have largely been trained in family systems theory which emphasises a persons system as contributing to their well being and/or unhappiness. I also subscribe to a humanistic view of counselling that extends an attitude of unconditional positive regard towards others, relating as one human to an other. Not superior or better than. I am also influenced by notions of feminist perspective around gender and power.

      I have a strong belief in a personal God who created me and am therefore influenced by the teachings of Jesus. My stance on many issues stems from the commandment to love God and to Love others and to do to others what you would have them do to you.

      I am always challenged and wrestling with how to allow my values and ethics to sit alongside each other in a coherent and useful way.
    • Which particular aspects of health or the human journey are you interested in?

    • I love seeing teenagers develop and grow in their capacity to cope with what life throws at them, I enjoy being part of a family's journey in helping them to reflect on their parenting and relationships as a family unit. On an individual level I love working with women who are learning to find their voice in their significant relationships.
    • What method/s do you use?

    • I approach therapy from Carl Rogers ideas of "unconditional positive regard" along with working with a person as part of a system (e.g. family, cultural, social). Motivational interviewing and "Prochaska's stages of change" are embedded in my thinking reminding me to stay with where clients are at, and not getting ahead of myself or them. Sometimes cognitive and behavioural models such as CBT, ACT, DBT and mindfulness are useful practical frameworks depending on the problem.
    • When do you think the client will start to feel that progress is being made?

    • This is always tricky. Sometimes just starting to see a counsellor is huge progress in itself. Some clients progress through goals quickly others take time depending on how embedded the problem is and how motivated the client is to change. Most people feel they are going two steps forward and one step back. From my experience, sustained progress should result in an increased ability to tolerate and manage emotions, better and wiser decision making, healthier relationships with people and a general sense of satisfaction and freedom. Not easy to get there but definitely possible!
    • How has therapy made you a better person?

    • It has challenged me to examine my own life, past and present, how I affect others and how I can grow in maturity as a person.
    • What do you like most about being a therapist?

    • I consider it a privilege to be granted the opportunity to give people what I consider a universal need, an experience of being listened to and taken seriously. I like figuring out with people how they can improve their lives and the lives of people around them.
    • Do you ever have 'bad hair' days?

    • Thank goodness I have bad hair days - imagine how self assured and lacking in compassion I would be without them. It is much easier to deal out advice to others than apply that knowledge to my own life! The older I get the more complicated life seems to be with challenges thrown at me in my own family life and in my wider life of relating to people. If I am expecting my clients to make difficult changes in their life I must be prepared to do the same.

      My bad hairs days are often a product of multi-tasking, acting too quickly on a feeling/hunch, or avoiding something that needs attending to. I am beginning to learn that in some circumstances less is often more and in others better management of my own anxiousness is required.

      I am still learning that it's ok to make mistakes (reminding myself that I'm not superhuman and no-one expects me to be) and knowing the difference between a genuine mistake/oversight on my part vs when someone else is not taking responsibility. The latter requires courage to stand my ground with grace and compassion - the former requires acknowledgment and behaviour /attitude change on my part. I am lucky enough to have in my life people who mentor, supervise and give me good advice in these situations.

      On my bad hair days I am still learning to balance how to be "self" caring and "other" caring and how to know the difference.
    • What do you think is the most significant problem we face, in the world today?

    • Put most simply, the human propensity towards self involvement, selfish ambition and believing we ourselves are fully in control of our own lives and destiny.
    • Can you share the name of a book, film, song, event or work of art that inspires you?

    • I enjoy anything by CS Lewis, especially The Lion the Witch and The Wardrobe. I am inspired by many songs and musicians but piano to play and listen to is my great love.
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    Ms Jenny Sanbrook

    Jenny Sanbrook

    Family Therapist, Counsellor

    Jenny uses a collaborative, validating approach to understand presenting concerns. Therapy is non-blaming and strengths are explored. Jenny encourages greater awareness of one's own behaviours and thoughts as a vehicle for change. Therapy may involve exploring early family of origin issues, attachment and losses and aims to identify strategies for dealing with anxiety and stress, to improve relationships and satisfaction in all domains of life....

    • Gordon
    • ACT, Christian Counselling, Emotionally Focused Therapy, Marriage and Family, Mindfulness, Schema Therapy, Systems Theory