Psychotherapists and Counsellors Answer your Questions

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  • Andrea Szasz
    The term Brave Therapy is in honor of the bravery of my clients; the courage they have shown to change their lives is truly inspirational. I’ve been a therapist for 10 + years helping hundreds of people to change their lives for the better. I specialize in the treatment of underlying trauma, and been personally involved with people who have suffered intensely. I have undergone my own personal therapy. I understand what it feels like when life is unmanageable. My own experiences have fuelled my passion to find the best treatments...
  • Corinne Lindsell
    I have always been in the Helping profession, since I was in high school (working in recreation programs for people with disabilities). This led me to work overseas in a Summer Camp in USA for special needs, and I worked with the New Jersey Foster System, which opened my eyes to youth work and child protection. This lead me to commencing youth Work and then completing a Post Graduate Degree in Social Work. ...
  • Stephanie Thompson
    I had a most wonderful Organisational Psychology professor at university who was also a highly effective counsellor. He got tangible, fast results for people. This was against a backdrop of extremely poor outcomes achieved by the psychological counselling profession as a whole at that time (circa 1990) - actually zero net benefit shown in our research. My professor was stridently critical of this, and rightly so. I found his pragmatic and empathic dedication to 'doing what works' - evidence-based therapy - very inspiring. I...
  • Liz Scarfe
    I'd like to think I knew what led me here, but really, life and the directions it takes us is such a mystery, I probably don't know the full story. I started studying Process Oriented Psychology because I saw the depth of insight and awareness about life that it could give me - which is a deep kind of power. So was at first a very personal healing journey because Process Oriented Psychology demands the student do a significant amount of their own therapy, in part because therapy is so much about our capacity to connect with...
  • Amanda Jones
    I wanted to study psychology when I finished school but for various reasons I was unable to. After working for many years in small businesses and large corporations, I decided to revisit my interest in psychology. I have always been interested in people, their lives, struggles and often extraordinary resilience. No matter what my professional role, I have always found myself encouraging others to reach their potential, to fulfill their dreams and passions, and overcome self-limiting beliefs often developed during their childhood or...
  • Connie Reed
    My background as a Health Project Coordinator working with homeless and disadvantaged young people and vulnerable children and parents. This was highly rewarding, very challenging and energising work. ...
  • Benjamin Shields
    It is a cliche, but I was one of those kids who wanted to 'help people' when he grew up. I couldn't think of any other profession that was as direct in this sense, as the work of a psychologist. So, that's what I pursued. As an 18-year-old, the long journey required to become a psychologist was difficult to comprehend. I studied for four years initially before undertaking a two-year internship, which involved regular supervision and study. After that, I completed a further two years of study for a masters program. Then still,...
  • Stacey McCraw
    I hold personal values centered around making positive contributions to the community in meaningful ways. I have always believed that mental health is just as important as physical health and should be given more attention. Often it doesn't really feel like work! ...
  • John Bacash
    I believe in service and compassion as a way of being which gives back to me as much as I give to others. ...
  • Jacinta Franich
    I have always been drawn to psychotherapy and counselling and initially started training to be a counsellor when I was 28 years old. I found that I didn't have the life experience or maturity at that stage, so put my study on hold until later in life. After I had children, I was again drawn to helping others and went back to studying, now fully ready to embrace the life of a counsellor and help others when they are struggling with life issues....
  • Sarah Harwood
    Since I was a little girl I have always been the person that people would confide in. When I started teaching music at the age of 16 my students would often talk to me about difficulties at home or school. This inspired me years later to complete a Master of Arts in Counselling, specialising in marriage, children, and families. Since then I have enjoyed helping people discover their strengths to lead contented and fulfilling lives....
  • Judy Christian
    I originally (back in the 70s) studied Social Work, but then returned a couple of years later to study Psychology. I have always enjoyed helping people to solve problems and improve their life, and it's great to see people learning to be more proactive and managing issues in their life more effectively. I still really enjoy my job and hope to continue for several more years!...
  • Dana Mitrovic
    I had always had a strong interest in understanding people. Not just from a perspective of what makes us struggle, but mostly to understand what makes us each unique. I found that developing my knowledge about the human mind, development and the way which our experiences shape us was immeasurably helpful in understanding myself and those around me. The relationship which you have in therapy is the most unique, which you will ever have the opportunity to develop. Every person has a path and a journey, and it is an absolute privilege...
  • Jodie Gale
    In the early nineties, I was working at a new age bookstore and crystal shop in Covent Garden in London, when I discovered a book called Swimming with Wild Dolphins. That day, I zipped out at lunch time and booked a flight to Dingle, a small fishing village on the South West Coast of Ireland where Fungie, a wild bottlenose dolphin had made his home. I continued to swim with him for 15 years, but it was this first encounter that I had what Maslow called a peak experience. In many ways, my spiritual awakening shone the light on the...
  • Christina Taylor
    Once a victim of incest, it took some years and excellent therapists to see myself as a strong woman, able to be a loving and sexual partner. I believe that all people, young and old, deserve to have intimacy in their lives, and I am a strong advocate in regular healthy sexual pleasures. As I aged I recognized the wisdom gained through my own journey, the learning's received from wise mentors and the extraordinary teachings I acquired as a student of psychotherapy....
  • Peggy Cook
    When I was younger and teaching English a man on my team inspired me. He was able to fully involve students in classroom work, have fun and have everyone learning. He told me he learnt these skills in a psychodrama group. When I started psychodrama I was both terrified and fascinated. At first I watched from the edge and then as I felt safe I joined in. I became more involved and found a way of examining my thoughts, feelings and actions that made sense to me. I learnt to reflect my experience rather react thoughtlessly and try to...
  • Andrew Lindsay
    I was practicing Chinese Medicine and became really interested in talking with people about how they were going in their lives. Then I went to some workshops connecting mind and body to psychotherapy and I was hooked. I loved the experiential way of working and integrating mind and body experiences – it felt very satisfying and natural and that I had come home....
  • Patrick Moloney
    When I was young certain people in my life were great role models. One person in particular was accepting of some of my issues and was great to talk to. As I grew older and wiser I developed a belief that I too could help people by being a non-judgemental listener. So I studied counselling after having a broad working life....
  • Steve White
    I decided on a career as a Psychotherapist & Counsellor as a result of a very successful and fruitful period of personal therapy, following a deep depression....
  • Peter Howie
    I found people so interesting and then I found that following that interest turned out to be a form of therapy as well. I was exploring myself through psychodrama groups when I realised that I wanted to understand how psychodrama worked and what this meant about myself and others. Once I had done lots of training, I began to work with people. Simple really. Then I continued to train and learn and understand other ways to work with folks, and other ways that folks learned, and began to apply these as well....
  • Romana Bowd
    When my dad was diagnosed with cancer (parietal lobe tumour) I watched his struggle with the diagnosis and then the need for him to face his mortality. I also watched as an older teen how the will to fight waxed and waned depending on how his treatment went. He unfortunately did not have a good prognosis and died shortly after. I realised that the human spirit can endure so much and that our emotions and attitude says so much about us as individuals. I left my unfulfilled Science degree and never looked back after starting psychology....
  • Bronwen Bailey
    Becoming a psychologist was a mid life career change for me. After some years working in the field of human rights, addressing global issues I decided that I wanted to work with people on an individual level. I had always been very curious about how to understand and explain people’s behaviours and responses to life experiences. So training as a psychologist was a natural conclusion. Like most psychologists there are experiences in my own life that helped shape these interests....
  • Jessica Vivien
    I had a close sister who committed suicide when we were in our teens, and I first needed to understand how such things can happen, and then to understand how they can be prevented. I then became aware that I had also been through severe trauma in our dysfunctional family and needed to learn to deal with the effects and heal myself. Having learn these things, I then wanted to share what I learnt to help others on the journey. I have also met some amazing psychotherapists, especially hynotherapist Maureen Kaluchi of Sydney, who...
  • Kim Bailey
    It chose me. No, just kidding. But for the books, I was at a crossroad in my life and needed, yes needed to find a vocation that was meaningful and one that is also sense making. 10 years down the track, I am glad. It is both meaningful and sense making....
  • Dinah Buchanan
    I initially had several personal crises that I sought counselling for and was incredibly moved by the quality of the support that was offered to me by my counsellor. I originally started my working life as a nurse and it seemed a natural progression to wanting to help others in the way that I had been so beautifully helped. My journey has taken me further into training counsellors and psychotherapists and I feel honoured and privileged to now accompany others on their journey of growth and change....
  • Laurie Brotherstone
    I always gravitated to work that involved helping people and becoming a psychologist enabled me in train professionally in a field so I knew what I was doing was evidence based and could really help to change people's lives and help. Why we act, feel, and think the way we do and how different that can be from other people around us fascinated me. Helping people understand themselves and others can reduce the conflict and stress in our lives and help people move towards the things that are important to them....
  • Christine Vickers
    I was curious to learn more about myself, and through this became interested in working in this field....
  • Volker Krohn
    In my 20s I embarked on a journey of trying to find my ‘Self’. Having grown up in a good upper middle class family in Germany, I could not find any life satisfaction from participating in the consumer ‘economic miracle’ of post -war Germany. So I left, as many other young people also did at this time, to find ‘enlightenment’, by travelling through India, participating in meditation retreats and listening to wise Indian men, who basically told me that I was a ‘Buddha’ already, that my “suffering was bogus” and...
  • Matthew Evans
    I wanted to make a contribution to people’s health, happiness and wellbeing. I had a longstanding personal interest in the field of psychology and it seemed a natural step to turn it into my profession. ...
  • Christopher Basten
    I have always had an interest in the human condition - what it means to think and feel. This extended to wanting to understand why some people think and feel differently ina way that causes them pain....
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